1964

Garratt 408, Oodla Warra - No Artist - Narrow Gauge In South Australia (Vinyl)

Beyer Peacock - Garratt Locomotives Register. Works Number - / Gauge/Railway/Class - 2'6"/Victorian Government Rlys/G. Type - + No. G Notes - Australia. G Built in and painted all-over black, this Garratt locomotive was issued to the Moe to Walhalla line where it remained—other than for overhauls—until the.

Garratt Publishing.

No. is a 2'-gauge ex-South African Railways 'NGG16' class Beyer-Garratt locomotive. It was built by Beyer Peacock & Co of Manchester (builder's No of ) to their "Beyer Garratt" patented design of articulated steam locomotive. The South African Railways Class NG G16 + of is a narrow gauge steam locomotive.

This photograph, taken between and , is of the rear driving unit and water tank from the 3 foot 6 inch ( mm) narrow gauge, + , Australian Standard Garratt steam locomotive G21, built by Clyde Engineering Co. Ltd in the Sydney suburb of Granville for .

Rear unit of Australian Standard Garratt G2. This photograph, taken between and , shows the rear driving unit, front driving unit and water tanks from the three foot six inch ( mm) narrow gauge + Australian Standard Garratt steam locomotive G It was built by Clyde Engineering Co. Ltd, works number , in the Sydney.


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2 Replies to “Garratt 408, Oodla Warra - No Artist - Narrow Gauge In South Australia (Vinyl)”

  1. The Union-Garratt, like the Golwe and Modified Fairlie, was not perpetuated on anything like the scale of the Garratt, and no known examples survive. War locomotives. During World War II, several Garratt designs were built to meet the wartime needs of narrow-gauge railways in Africa, Asia and Australia.

  2. The ASG was to be a suitable narrow gauge locomotive aimed at easing a chronic shortage of motive power on the various state 3’6" gauge systems, which was a result of the advent of World War 2. Sixty-five ASG locos were built in –44 by railway workshops in South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia, and by Clyde Engineering in Sydney.

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